Edward Enninful Appointed The Editor In Chief Of British Vogue

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Edward Enninful Appointed The Editor In Chief Of British Vogue

It has been announced that as of August 1st Edward Enninful OBE, will take the helm of British Vogue as the new editor in chief. Enninful is a former model, stylist and current creative and fashion director of W Magazine.

Earlier this year Alexandra Shulman, declared that after 25 years of service she will be stepping down from the role as editor in chief. However, it wasn’t until yesterday afternoon that her predecessor was announced. Shulman said, "Edward is an exceptionally talented stylist who will no doubt bring an exciting new creative aesthetic to the magazine…”

Enniful’s career thus far has been incredibly successful; he became the fashion director of I-D at just 18 years old, and has since gone on to work for Italian Vogue, Vogue, and most recently W Magazine. He has also been awarded the Isabella Blow Award for Fashion Creator at the 2014 British Fashion Awards, and received an OBE for his services to fashion.

The appointment of Enninful, 45, is also one for the record books, as he is the first man of colour to edit a mainstream women’s fashion magazine.

We are very excited to see the creative direction of British Vogue under the fresh hands of Edward Enninful, and wish him luck in this new position.

 

Words by Paris Richardson

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Fashion Scout SEE Winner!

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Fashion Scout SEE Winner!

Fashion Scout are pleased to announce the winner of the first ever Fashion Scout South East Europe (SEE) competition, held on the evening of Tuesday 28th March 2017 at Belgrade Fashion Week is Neo Design!

 The debut competition saw four regional countries each put forward three of their best emerging designers from their local fashion weeks, which included Skopje Fashion Week in Macedonia, Fashion.hr in Croatia, Ljubljana Fashion Week in Slovenia and Belgrade Fashion Week in Serbia.

Neo Design will receive a fully sponsored slot to showcase on-schedule during LFW at Fashion Scout SS18 in Freemasons Hall, Covent Garden this September. Fashion Scout is renowned for championing, nurturing and showcasing innovative and creative design talent from around the world, and Fashion Scout SEE is another way for us to source talent from around across the world.

Neo Design is a young brand founded by Nevena Ivanović in 2014 as part of a graduation project and she was shortlisted as one of the three emerging designers by Belgrade Fashion Week for the Fashion Scout SEE competition. The brand is based on a new vision of functionality which was developed as the result of combining the traditional technique of making clothing and jewellery with modern technical materials.

The Fashion Scout SEE winning collection ATHENEO, is inspired by the motives from the book Hazarski Rećnik by Milorada Pavić and his approach to this unique piece of art. The book was written in a way that it can be read and observed like a sculpture, from many different angles and viewpoints and this approach has been reflected across Neo Design’s collection.

Fashion Scout SEE was judged by four industry experts including; Martyn Roberts founder of Fashion Scout, Hilary Alexander renowned fashion journalist and Britain’s Next Top Model judge, Adrian Roberts Director of Education at Accademia Costume e Moda in Rome and Biljana Poposka-Roberts Industry & Special Projects Manager at Graduate Fashion Week. Neo Design presented the collection to the judging panel, before being showcased in a joint Fashion Scout SEE catwalk on-schedule during Belgrade Fashion Week, where they were announced as the winner to close the show.

Fashion Scout is the international showcase for fashion pioneers. Over the past 10 years Fashion Scout has scouted, supported, nurtured and showcased pioneering designers including Iris Van Herpen, Peter Pilotto, Eudon Choi, David Koma , Felder Felder, Maria Francesca Pepe, Piers Atkinson, Agi and Sam, Eudo Choi, Roberts|Wood, Helen Lawrence, Georgia Hardinge and many more.

Featuring a selection of innovative UK and international designers, Fashion Scout London hosted over 40 catwalk shows, salon shows and presentations alongside a designer exhibition in February 2017. Fashion Scout London is held at the iconic Freemasons’ Hall, Covent Garden, from Friday 15th – Tuesday 19th September 2017, Fashion Scout’s 23rd season during London Fashion Week. 

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Fashion Scout South East Europe

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Fashion Scout South East Europe

Earlier this week, on Tuesday 28th March, Fashion Scout South East Europe launched during Belgrade Fashion Week. There were emerging designers from Serbia, Macedonia, Croatia and Slovenia showcasing their work, and the managing director of Fashion Scout International travelled to Belgrade to see it all happen. 

 
"Fashion Scout SEE is an exciting initiative that gives emerging designers from South East Europe a unique opportunity to interact with media and buyers at Fashion Scout London. It follows on the success of Fashion Scout Kiev, which introduced a whole generation of Ukranian talent to the international market.
The winner and runners up of Fashion Scout SEE showed great potential and indicate great promises for the designers from their perspective countries."
Martyn Roberts

 

Overall, thirteen innovative designers, from a cross section of the participating South Eastern European countries took part. From Slovenia, there was Ana Jelinic, Petja Zorec and Sarivalenci. From Macedonia, there was Ana Marija, Shaleva Couture and Victor Kaiser. Serbia had three more designers, Neo Design by Nevena Ivanovic, Ana Trosic Trajkovic and Lada Dragovic and from Croatia, there was Yuniku, Price on Request, and Klisab. 

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SS18 APPLICATIONS NOW OPEN!

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SS18 APPLICATIONS NOW OPEN!

Designers are able to apply for catwalk shows, presentations, installations and London Exhibition, alongside Fashion Scout's coveted sponsored Merit Award and Ones To Watch. 

With 10 years experience producing more than 400 catwalk shows, Fashion Scout are renowned for their professionalism and scouting abilities, managing and producing hundreds of boundary pushing highly acclaimed events. 

Designers are selected by a panel of industry experts which features leading buying, media and business advisors. It has previously included Sara Maino of Italian Vogue, Hilary Alexander OBE, Stavros Karelis and former fashion features editor for Vogue online, Jessica Bumpus. Thier decision is based on the creative vision of the brands and collections quality of work and business potential. 

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Masque BAR Competition!

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Masque BAR Competition!

MasqueBAR, the experts in at-home sheet masks, were on hand during London Fashion Week to ensure our models and guests were kept looking and feeling fresh.

After London Fashion Week, many attendees, from models to photographers, influencers to writers, are left seeing the damage of minimal sleep in the condition of their skin. With Masque BAR as a sponsor this year, everyone was able to keep the telling under eye circles to a minimum!

masque bar 2.jpg

The quick to use sheets are a non invasive way to refresh your skin, for a variety of different skin types, so don't worry if you've not found a face mask that works for you yet...you may have just found it. 

For the chance to win some of the innovative beauty products, developed in South Korea, the beauty capital of the world, just answer the question below, along with your email and name so that we can contact you should you win! 

The competition closes on Friday 10th March

Name *
Name
How long does it take for Masque BAR products to improve your skin?
Masque BAR competition

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SPONSORSHIP

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SPONSORSHIP

Those brands that helped make it all happen...

Fashion Scout would love to send their sincerest thanks to all of our sponsors, for enabling the largest season ever, bringing fresh talent to the forefront of the fashion industry once again.

Without our sponsors we could not celebrate fashion in the way that we do. They are the lifeblood of the backstage and ensure that what we and our amazing designers work is always spot on. We could not be more grateful here at Fashion Scout for their continued support, so thank you!

Toni & Guy were London Fashion Week AW17's official haircare product, in partnership with the British Fashion Council and through label.m have ensured that the models gracing the catwalk have done so, yet again, without a hair out of place, looking just as immaculate and remarkable as the clothes on show. This is why we continue to rely on their support.

Kryolan have always been amazing, as usual, which is why we welcomed them back, AW17 proving to be another great year in partnership with us. Their creativity and unusual use of make up as an artistic medium perfectly supports the pioneering attitude we champion here at Fashion Scout.

Masque Bar, the at home masks, were a great addition this year. During the hectic long weekend that is London Fashion Week, Masque Bar provided the opportunity to relax, and focus on the quiet. From the under eyes masks that cover up the fact that you did stay for an extra cocktail at that after party last night, to the sheet masks that help your skin to remain vibrant all day, at home sheet masks have become a new obsession for all that tried them backstage.  

Gold Collagen, a new sponsor for this year, handed out their innovative drinks to our models, creatives and influencers backstage. Who needs beauty sleep, when you have this? Gold Collagen present a new way of thinking when it comes to taking care of our skin.

 

It can be thirsty work executing shows to the standard that our designers achieve, hence why Halo Coco were a marvellous addition to the backstage area. Using coconut milk and a blend of superfood ingredients, Halo Coco provided for even the most health conscious of our teams, harnessing the unparalleled power of coconuts.

Patch joined the team this season, in the form of a plant based exhibition at the entrance of Freemasons Hall. It was not only insta-worthy but the urban garden that the iconic London venue needed!

FIJI Water are the crisp, refreshing brand everyone knows and loves. From their aesthetically pleasing bottles to the natural origins of the water, FIJI Water was the only h2o that we could consider having backstage. They discovered the finest water on the planet, and bought it to London Fashion Week.  

Propress steamers, ensured that the pieces heading down the catwalk were in tiptop shape, and styled by steam. We'd like to thank Propress for being a continuous partner of Fashion Scout, and for their professionalism each and every season.

 

Words by Luke Connolly and Annabel Waterhouse-Biggins

Photography by Samira Eugster, Nicholas Kristiansen and Maja Jankowska

 

 

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GOLD COLLAGEN

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GOLD COLLAGEN

This year, Fashion Scout was very pleased to have Gold Collagen backstage and front of house, keeping the skin and energy levels of models, influencers, and photographers alike in perfect condition. 

We asked the digital team what they thought of Gold Collagen's beauty drinks, and the response was overwhelmingly positive. One photographer said that they were surprised something that was good for your skin, could taste this good too. If your skincare routine is getting a little tired, especially in the cold weather, and no amount of moisturiser or extra attention in terms of outside products seems to be making a difference, why not give Gold Collagen a try?

 

"I love the little glass bottles, and the fact that I know I'm doing something good for my skin beyond the average"

Laura Cawdron, Digital Writer

 

Fashion Scout would like to thank Gold Collagen for their support this season, and for providing bursts of energy throughout the show schedule- as well as the prolonged improvement in our skin!

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WE'VE MOVED!

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WE'VE MOVED!

The Fashion Scout team are moving to a larger premises this week, and we want to make sure you all know where to find us! 

From the 1st March, the Fashion Scout office will be based at the following:

East London Works

Studio 3.28

75 Whitechapel Road

Whitechapel 

London

E1 1DU

 

Please update your records!

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International Fashion Showcase 2017

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International Fashion Showcase 2017

The British Fashion Council and the British Council united with Mercedes-Benz to present work from emerging fashion designers from 26 countries for the International Fashion Showcase 2017. The group plays a central role during London Fashion Week, as it celebrates the global scale of fashion in modern culture.

The group of Egyptian designers who worked towards the pieces on display emphasised the theme of ‘100% Egyptian cotton’ which was ‘deeply rooted in Egyptian history [since] the beginning of the 19th century,’ eventually becoming ‘the major income for Egypt in the 1970s.’ A sense of interconnectedness rises as the central theme, as the cultural legacy of Egyptian cotton ‘stands for excellence’ in the eyes of the designers. Indeed, the creative responses from all the countries involved displayed a highly nuanced and imaginative take on the Local/ Global theme, which was particularly reflected in the three winners of the showcase.

During the 17th and 21st of February 2017, an eclectic series of installations were displayed in the West Wing of Somerset House. A detailed exploration of the contrast between local and global style served as the central theme of the show. In particular, the symbiotic relationship between fashion and the world at large is displayed, as each installation reverberated with the echoes of social change and nature. The aim the British Fashion Council was to artfully illustrate the idiosyncrasies of environments reflected in the different methods of designing fashions. Multiplicity is the muse of the showcase, as the vivid variety of global styles were united under Somerset House.

The Designer Award was presented to Younchan Chung of the-sirius for their striking designs for the Korean installation; by revealing a unique interpretation on the traditional bojagi wrapping cloths, the team channelled the dynamic multi-functionality of the modern world. The Country Award was presented to Jaspreet Chandok of India for ‘The Indian Pastoralists’ exhibition. Taking a step away from the bustle of the cities, the nomadic pastoral communities of India served as the centre of their narrative. The juxtaposition between the preservation of the ancient world and the changes of an industrialised world offered an insightful and creative vision. Finally, the Curation Award was presented to Wojciech Dziedzic and Agnieszka Jacobson-Cielecka of Poland. Inspired by the philosophy of ‘slow fashion,’ the team found resourceful ways of challenging the unethical, mass-produced fashions that dominate the global scene.

By considering fashion as a varied landscape, encompassing the highs and lows of culture alongside the evolving flora and fauna, the International Fashion Showcase of 2017 revealed the exquisite richness of global fashion.

Words by Aisha Diomande 

Photographs by Julie Liu

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FAD

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FAD

Fashion Scout is pleased to announce that this year’s FAD competition winner, in collaboration with Missoni, is Amy Carter: a final-year student at Nottingham Trent.

Amy’s work was the creative pinnacle of over 120 entries from 40 UK universities, with 20 finalists revealing their inspired looks in the show, working from a brief: ‘Art, Design, Colour’, which asked students to take the Missoni approach. It was a very high quality collection of pieces in which many of the students did opt for knitwear based designs, but also played with the form, drawing on varied inspirations ranging from a number of European artists to brutalist architecture. Two runners up were also announced, who receive £500 each, as well as a SPEOS London Graduate Collection photoshoot. These were Sarah Carter, from Bath Spa University, and Sophie Whatling who studies at the Arts University Bournemouth. A special mention was also given to Zoe Alexandria Leach of the Manchester Fashion Institute.

Innovative and playful, like Missoni, Amy’s two pieces totally embraced knitwear and echoed the love of bold colour and distinctive pattern that Missoni has built its name around. Amy cited her inspiration as the “sounds of the knitting machines, which made the shapes, silhouettes and patterns” of her designs and said that she certainly didn’t expect to win, repeating her thanks to everyone involved in the project.

Jane Shepherdson CBE, judging panelist and fashion entrepreneur, detailed the reason behind the choice, saying “Amy’s was totally original, really good fun, and knitwear based which links in with Missoni’s heritage – we thought it was so clever: the puffer jacket was knitted and none of us had ever seen that before!”

Liz Griffiths, Head of Creative Textile and Design Research at Missoni said that “we found an all-rounder, which is what we were looking for: it was a collection finished. She mixed different patterns and knitted textures together, very well. The finishing, the styling and the way the clothes were put together were quite fantastic, and quite Missoni too”. FAD, which stands for Fashion Awareness Direct, is a charity which aims to “inspire, promote and support intelligent fashion design” and has been established now for 17 years. Maria Alvarez, FAD founder, spoke of her desire “to give opportunities to young people, to help them in their progression from academia to establishment in the fashion industry” adding “everything is worth it - to see all the students here tonight, it just makes me so happy and proud”.

The showcase may have been the end of this year’s FAD competition process, but is the start of a lot more to come from these burgeoning designers, many of whom will graduate this year and begin work on their own collections. Well done to all for a diverse, creative and colourful show.

Words by Luke Connolly

Photography by Ellouise Gray  

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BARRUS

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BARRUS

Turkish design duo Neslisah Yilmaz and Nur Caglayan returned to Fashion Scout today to present Barrus AW17 collection. Renowned for taking elements from Turkish history and infusing them with innovation, the latest Barrus collection was inspired by the seventh wonder of the ancient world: The Hanging Gardens of Babylon. 

The influence of the Babylon gardens was apparent through looks featuring a modern take the traditional Babylon Dress, whilst staying true to the culture's values in both excellent fabrics and craftsmanship.

Peplum-sleeved dresses in opulent autumnal tones were adorned with elements of raw silk with sheer floral satins and an element of statement glamour. Embellishments added feminine touches to masculine tailoring as traditional column dresses were edged with sparkles and feathers adding a touch of extravagancy to each look.

Equal parts unique and glamorous, the Barrus AW17 collection showed that individuality remains the underlying message of the brand's aesthetic. 

Words by Elizabeth Renfrey

Photography by Kathrin Werner 

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JOHN HERRERA

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JOHN HERRERA

John Herrera’s surreal Autumn/Winter 2017 collection, Agila, fuses outstandingly crafted shapes with innovative and unconventional patterns to form a selection of pieces bursting with self-expression.

Interweaving his vibrant Filipino heritage with contemporary craftsmanship, Herrera’s presentation is inspired by tribal art and tattoos from Luzon, the largest island in the Philippines. Elaborate Philippines eagle motifs, printed using dye-sublimation technology, undoubtedly depict the free spirited essence of the collection. Elegantly voluminous robes with forked trains, skin hugging dresses with accentuated forked necklines, and winged black eyeliner all contributed flawlessly to the unique aesthetic influenced by the national bird.

Despite a limited brown and white palette, the pieces are daring and unconventional, showcasing bold silhouettes. Set on a backdrop of eclectic Filipino tribal music Herrera’s pieces balance heavily structured shoulders, rigid V shaped necklines, and prominent peplums, with traditional culture and vision.

Continuing to channel the tribal ethos of the collection, Herrera applies intricate beading to the outlines of robes and necklines to focus on the extravagant shaping of the pieces. Headbands, earrings and necklaces also embrace this distinctive trend with stones, beads and feathers adorning the model’s heads.

Words by Laura Cawdron 

Photography by Nicholas Kristiansen 

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IRYNVIGRE

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IRYNVIGRE

IRYNVIGRE, a London-based fashion label founded by IRYN VI in 2015, creates timeless and versatile staples for people who appreciate the intricacies behind the craftsmanship of their unique pieces. Despite the demands of modernity, IRYNVIGRE is invested in promoting the principles of sustainable fashion; by supporting the work of ateliers, the label embodies the essence of authenticity.

IRYNVIGRE proudly belongs to the slow fashion movement, which champions the act of designing and buying unique pieces that display quality, and prove to be long-lasting. In light of the label’s functionality, the collection embraces minimalism, whilst retaining the eclectic vision of the designer, IRYN VI.

A futuristic narrative lies at the heart of the latest AW17/18 collection, as the fabric is utilised as a language to communicate the transition of a society in motion. The collection favours warm ‘human’ colours, ranging from soft greys to vibrant reds; with ease, each shade is enhanced by the soft silhouettes which flow down the catwalk. The oversized jackets and coats engulf the models, yet they do not appear alienating to the eye. The soft forms are offset by the raw, rough edges, giving a sense of simplicity to the collection. 

Artfully, IRYNVIGRE’s collection appeals to the feeling of comfort and familiarity despite conveying the inevitability of a future to come. The label’s nuanced approach to futurism departs from the cold iron figures that dominate the narrative, and instead merges a sense of humanity to the artificiality of technical progress.

Words by Aisha Diomande

Photography by Ellouise Gray 

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Harry XU

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Harry XU

Harry Xu showcased his AW17 Menswear collection titled ‘Jarylo Reborn’ to an overflowing audience in Freemasons Hall today.

Once again, the collection drew inspiration from Michael Chelbin’s photography, his work also inspiring Xu’s SS16 Graduate Collection ‘My Russian Symphony – Youth Prisoners’. AW17 also found inspiration from the deity Jarlyo, son of the Slavic God of Thunder: whose tale was one of rebirth, protection, and hope. A soundtrack set the atmosphere with ‘Deluxe Preparation’ by Chan Wong Wing and Muse’s ‘The 2nd Law: Isolated System’, having examples of heavy electronic bass being reminiscent of thunder itself.

This inspiration was clearly evident, the show having a semblance of dark drama. An interesting theme in the show was Rebirth. Xu reimagining the structures of conventional masculinity with exquisite floral patterns, and moments of flamboyance with elegant, almost romantic chiffons. The collection contrasted light, transparent silks and had heavier virgin wools with thick, exaggerated overcoats that were opposed open, with elegant and light shirts.

Xu was supposed to “showcase a narrative that leads from child prisoner, to creatively curious adult.” The collection opened with stark monochrome pieces, off set with blocks of colour reflecting the rigidity of imprisonment and fitting more closely to the typically masculine form with stark, straight lines. This was also mirrored with high turtle-necks, and large military-esque gloves acting as barriers to the body, barriers that were totally stripped with other pieces.

Creativity flourished later on in the show moving away from the black and white palette toward utility-wear tones with entire outfits of rich, sophisticated navy. Flowers popped out of the fabrics, metallic shapes adorned a stunning overcoat, and the imaginative conceptual adult was fully realised. This collection was a testament to Harry Xu’s craftsmanship and attention to detail.

Words by Luke Connolly

Photography by Nicholas Kristiansen

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DAVID FERREIRA

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DAVID FERREIRA

David Ferreira’s AW17 collection attributes its inspiration to the peculiar and unusual world of the circus, as his fascination with freak shows and sideshows reveals a mind that embraces a fantastical realm. As a Lisbon-based womenswear label, it skilfully unites traditional and modern aesthetics. For this collection in particular, the cult-film Freaks (1932), The Victorian Freak Show and the photographic works of Joel-Peter Witkin act as springboards into the depths of the distorted visions of the circus. However, Ferreira artfully expands beyond this image, and displays the splendour of individuality; to stand at the margins of society is to embrace the beauty of eccentricity.

To break with convention and to explore the liminal spaces of fashion is Ferreira’s unique talent; his arresting pieces play with the shape of women’s silhouettes, creating a visual melody that blends midnight blues, vivid pinks and chartruse yellows which shimmer gracefully on the flowing silk satin textures offset by straightened Mongolian lamb. Worn with confidence and elegance, the models’ vivacious make-up reflected the dramatic essence of performance art, reflecting the other-worldly inspiration of the collection. Ferreira’s celebration of the carnivalesque alongside the avant-garde echoes throughout his collection, creating desirable pieces that embody the spirit of an iconoclastic woman. 

Amongst the bold colours, structured forms played a large role in conveying the theatricality of Ferreira’s ‘Freakball’ concept; by pushing form and colour to their limits, Ferreira showcased a captivating collection which exemplifies the ideals of experimentation. At every turn, a sense of rebellion is placed at the foreground, reminding his audience that fearless subversion is the source of liberty.

Words by Aisha Diomande

Photography by Kathrin Werner 

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LEKAT

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LEKAT

“We are here to salute the soil, the air, the sun, the rain, and the heart of the people of Baduy, Indonesia”.

The AW17/18 collection, comprised of 24 individual looks, and split into three different rotations shown twice, championed heritage and the honest simplicity of the ancient village of Baduy. It was also inspired in part by Indonesian folklore and focused on the theme of empowerment, according to Amanda Indah Lestari, Lekat's creative director. 

In an immersive presentation, the models walked in amongst the watching audience, allowing for a closer look at the rustic fabrics. These were often layered, with formal, structured foundations made mobile by Amanda’s ability to connect tradition with innovation by playing with shape and using traditional techniques and textiles to facilitate this. Some outfits sat delicately, androgynous, but with complimentary, contrasting colours, bold, but light and flowing. Collaborator Billie Jacobina’s prints expressed the rich culture drawn on for the collection, helping “to tell the narrative”. The clothes were accompanied by accessories, notably colourful and confident hats, ranging from Amanda’s earliest collection (2013) to the capsule collection for Jakarta Fashion Week 2017. 

Amanda was responsible for the designs themselves, and alongside Billie’s print techniques, used embroidery and traditional hand woven production, echoing her desire for sustainability: “There can be many, many, many colours in the clothes that I design. Yet, there can only be one mission: sustainable fashion”. The dynamic pair lived together for three months, Jacobina’s own collection, shown Friday, was also inspired by this visit. Amanda cited how she “tried to empower people from the village, to make them appreciate other cultures”. The array of different cultures represented and interspersed throughout the audience was a testament to this. 

Fashion Scout was certainly given a creative and reflective insight into Indonesian culture, with the collection “a true mark of market-meets-mission”.

Words by Luke Connolly

Photography by Nicholas Kristiansen

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HELLAVAGIRL

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HELLAVAGIRL

As the first model entered the runway in Freemason’s Hall this morning to present Hellavagirl’s AW17 collection, audiences were gasping. A majestic dress, drenched in gold sequins and styled with a humongous, black flower headpiece, perfectly illustrated what designer Helen Woollam and her brand stand for. 

After 15 years of experience in design and fine art, London College of Fashion alumni Helen Woollams founded Hellavagirl in 2011. With her innovative, creative and unique take on fairy tale like avant garde dresses, the designer was awarded the title 'Britain’s Top Designer' in 2016. The garments are designed with the mantra “inspire the wearer and intrigue the beholder” in mind, meaning it’s not unusual to find models dancing around the design studio, to see how the pieces work and move.

Creating under the motto “The Last Dawn on Mars”, Helen Woollams added a dark twist to her fairy tale couture this season. Large mesh infused sequin dresses with magnificent ruffles encapsulated the high-spirited nature of the brand’s flirtatious aesthetic. Enormous black flower headpieces adorned most garments and made Hellavagirl’s Autumn/Winter collection truly original. 

The theme found its climax in the final look. Five black flowers complimented a sparkling silk dress, concealing the model’s face from the lights of the Gallery. The show came to a close whilst cameras flashed, desperate to capture the last glimpse of an astonishingly powerful finale. 

Words by Gianluca Schappei

Photography by Tiffany Lin

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ALEXIS CARBALLOSA

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ALEXIS CARBALLOSA

 

“I don’t believe in conventions.”

Carballosa, a US based label focusses on haute couture; they revealed their latest collection for AW17, titled ‘Unbound’ at London Fashion Week. It was a visionary and meticulously crafted collection, inspired by the unexplored: the ‘depths of the underwater world, and the limitless universe’.

Certainly akin with the inspiration behind the collection, and curiously opposing colour palettes usually associated with AW showcases, Carballosa highlighted his desire to break down conventions, focussing on green and yellow tones, with metallic accents. His signature use of flowing silks, draped with gossamer fabrics echoed the movements of the ocean, and elegantly shimmered under the catwalk lights.

Carballosa himself said in an interview with Fashion Scout after the show, that the fabrics he uses helps to create “intensity and a sense of mystery” with both the oceans and universe having the same sense of transparency and changeable colours. The collection started brighter before reaching its darker, yet beautifully created and show-stopping finale.

Seeming to reflect the transition from the oceans to the universe, the last of the twenty-nine outfits was made from black silk gazar and chiffon, with exaggerated, layered shoulders – the model highlighting the brilliance of the chiffon train with gentle lifts, certainly giving the audience a lasting impression. The piece typified the structured, yet elegant creations that were constant throughout Carballosa’s show. An advocate for sustainability, using recycled plastics for his extravagant and classy headpieces, as well as being historically involved in environmental work and projects, Carbollasa is definitely an upcoming force in fashion. “Absolutely” he will be returning for SS.

Photography by Tiffany Lin

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HALLIE SARA

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HALLIE SARA

Since its debut in 2011, the New York City luxury label Hallie Sara has gained a devout following in the industry. Celebrating the brand’s London Fashion Week debut, designer Hallie Sara showcased her Autumn/Winter collection in the Freemason’s Hall at the Fashion Scout and had audiences on the edge of their seats.

The sumptuous collection showed a unique approach to high-end fashion, combining ready-to-wear with contemporary luxury designs. Solemnly handcrafted from the finest materials and inspired by a colour pallet reaching from beautiful bold earth shades to a variety of jewel tones, the AW17 collection mostly consisted of real leather and fur designs. 

Hallie combined traditional silhouettes with unique fabric manufacturing: A skin-tight black snake leather dress was the closing look of this show and a great highlight that kept cameras in the audience flashing. Real fur took an immense part in this collection. Fur hats, gilets, jackets and full-length coats added an interesting contrast to the leather designs and kept the collection as a whole well balanced. 

Photography by Nicholas Kristiansen

Words by Gianluca Schappei

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HOUSE OF MIDDLE EAST AND ASIA

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HOUSE OF MIDDLE EAST AND ASIA

House of Middle East & Asia (House of MEA), an initiative developed by FAD International Academy of India and Dubai, provides a platform to incubate and promote regional talent from the Middle East and Asia. 


Kajal Patel’s Autumn/Winter 2017 bridal and occasion wear flawlessly balances traditional Indian textiles with contemporary shapes and accents. ‘The Gold Collection’ oozes opulence using simple gold silk on traditional draped frames, intricate gold detailing on cream cottons and silks, and dramatic origami fans falling from waist. Chiffon, silk organza and embroidered cotton in various tones of gold formed art deco style structured shapes onto traditional bridal wear, establishing a modern artistic approach to Indian bridal wear. 


Felix Bendish’s ‘Oxygen’ collection juxtaposes experimental accessories and accents with conventional yet striking textile and shapes. Crystal encrusted mouthpieces, sparkling wool purses and pink, feathered chest plates protruding from the shoulders expresses creative drama and contrasts with simple white cream silhouettes. Bendish’s designs also integrate various textures: wool, leather, foiled chiffons, and lurex, to form vibrant garments, whilst still adopting a limited palette of creams, reds, and muted greens. 


Nivedita Saboo’s Autumn/Winter 2017 luxury collection infuses traditional Indian techniques with western textures and silhouettes. Menswear consisted of blue or black wool structured jackets, embellished with leather geometric panelling and collars, over monochrome leaf printed trousers. Womenswear was also utilitarian in structure, transforming feminine shapes and chiffon textures using leather, wool and belts replacing buttons. 

Words by Laura Cawdron

Photography by Tiffany Lin

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