The Swedish School of Textiles within the University of Boråsaims aims to push the boundaries and explore the entire field of textiles including technology, design and management. With around 900 students attending, the school hopes to inspire and create talented young designers fuelled with expert knowledge and the skills to work with textiles in an innovative and exciting way. They challenge concepts by experimenting with silhouettes and investigating what it means to give form to the body. The Swedish School of Textiles was originally founded in 1866 and offers seven undergraduate programmes and seven master’s programmes. Students are taught a variety of industry skills that will guide them through their journey to becoming conscious, new designers.  

Graduates that showcased their designs this season are; Carolina Johansson, Helga Lára Halldórsdóttir, Matilda Forssblad, Linda Dekhla, Stina Randestad, Linda Aasaru, Mario Eurenius, Stina Larsson, Alice Jardesten, Malin Westman, Lynn Tallvod, Ebba Andersson, Sarah Ljungdahl, Linn Sjögren, Axel Backlund, Rebecca Karlsson, Josephine Persson, Kajsa Willumsen, Elin Holm, August Gille, Linn Sohl, Karolina Centeno Norberg, Josefine Gennert Jakobsson, Matilda Envall and Emma Granberg Silfors.

Photography by Catherine Baker

This season the graduates explore themes of power, identity and gender. Textiles such as lace and leather juxtapose each other as themes of gender were investigated. Male-coded work-wear was deconstructed to challenge gender stereotypes and ideals as seen in Emma Grandberg Silfors designs. This was also displayed through the popular use of neon shades as females modelled bright orange high-visibility coats, displaying their oversized silhouette to challenge these ideas further. Designer Ebba Andersson contrasted evening wear and sportswear through experimenting with textiles such as mesh and iridescent tulle. Ideas surrounding the relations between garments and form were also displayed. Ebba mentioned that she “drew lines from evening dresses onto fabrics and then used drawstrings in the lines to make it fit the body”. 

Words by Ellie Pinder

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